Wall Street Journal interviews Butler Tech Precision Machining student

Julian Cornwall, a Butler Tech student studying Precision Machining, was recently interviewed by the Wall Street Journal on his recent multiple job offers. He is pictured in the Butler Tech precision machining lab at Colerain High School.

Julian Cornwall, a Butler Tech student studying Precision Machining, was recently interviewed by the Wall Street Journal on his recent multiple job offers.

 

First, it was more than a dozen manufacturers calling on Julian Cornwall with job opportunities. Then, it was the Wall Street Journal. The newspaper interviewed Cornwall and his Precision Machining instructor, David Fox, for an article focusing on an unprecedented shortage of skilled labor currently being experienced in the United States.

For students like Cornwall, training in advanced manufacturing during high school can lead to multiple job offers from businesses who are also willing to support their college education. Cornwall decided to accept an offer from Meyer Tool, Inc. The company not only offered to flex around his football schedule, they also offered to help pay for college tuition if he stays on with the company.

“In this day and age, manufacturers are basically fighting over good employees,” Deanna Adams, Meyer’s human-resources director, told the Journal. “It’s almost the opposite of how it used to be.”

Butler Tech begins recruiting for its high school manufacturing and construction programs during the sophomore year. For those who apply and are accepted, students will receive two years of free, hands-on skills training during their junior and senior year.

Similar programs are offered for adult learners who have completed high school or earned their GED. These programs can be completed in less than a year and lead to very high employment rates.

CLICK HERE to read the Wall Street Journal article.

Watch our video to see a recent skills competition